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The role of genetic and social factors in alcoholism, according to Amy Wachholtz

Aug. 13, 2019

Genetics make people more prone to alcohol addiction, but psycho-social factors — including life stressors, childhood abuse, early exposure to alcohol, anxiety and social acceptance — also play a role, says Amy Wachholtz, Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of the Clinical Health Psychology Ph.D. program. A person’s genetics might...

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Andrew Scahill on hyper-masculinity in horror

Aug. 13, 2019

According to Assistant Professor of English Andrew Scahill, who specializes in film studies, you’d be hard-pressed to think of one example of a male survivor in a horror film who isn’t hyper-masculine. He says, “It goes hand-in-hand with it being okay for a girl to be a tomboy, because of...

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John Tinnell on scooter use of public spaces

July 23, 2019

John Tinnell, Associate Professor of English and Director of Digital Initiatives, says the benefits of public rental e-scooters are obvious, but the drawbacks require a bit more investigation and big-picture thinking. Op-Ed: Are scooters a Trojan Horse for big tech to colonize our public spaces? LA Times , July 18

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Daniel Rees’ new JAMA study on marijuana usage and legalization

July 23, 2019

Daniel Rees and colleagues published research this month that found legalizing pot does not appear to encourage teen use and might actually discourage it. New JAMA study shows legalizing pot might discourage teen use CNBC , July 8 Study: Teen Use of Marijuana Drops in States Where It Is Legal...

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Watch out for the return of the nature revenge horror film, says Andrew Scahill

July 23, 2019

Not long ago, environmentalism played a role in moving the horror film genre forward. It was the early 1970s, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring had become a New York Times bestseller, and Americans were reckoning with the way that pesticides were decimating plants and animals. “There was this idea that we’ve...

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Amy Hasinoff on sexts resulting in sex offender registery of a minor

July 23, 2019

Amy Hasinoff, Associate Professor of Communications, was asked to comment after Colorado’s Supreme Court upheld a ruling that required a juvenile boy to register as a sex offender after trading erotic pictures with two girls roughly his age. Hasinoff said she was disappointed the court could not differentiate between child...

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Ambulances are cheaper than Uber in some cases, according to Andrew Friedson

July 23, 2019

"Medicaid patients in particular have incredibly low out-of-pocket responsibility for ambulances," said study author Andrew Friedson, Assistant Professor of Economics. "The most an ambulance ride covered under Medicaid costs the patient [is] three dollars. If there's a low-cost alternative to Uber to get to the hospital, you're going to take...

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Michael Berry weighs in on census citizenship question

July 23, 2019

“The Supreme Court basically held that the justification that the (U.S.) Commerce Department used to include the citizenship question on the census was not sufficient,” Michael J. Berry, Political Science Associate Professor, said. Colorado Attorney General claims ‘victory’ after Supreme Court rejects census citizenship question Denverite , June 27

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Jim Walsh’s research part of Irish Ambassador's trip to Colorado

June 18, 2019

A May 13 th diplomatic visit from the Ambassador of Ireland, Daniel Mulhall, to the Evergreen Cemetery in Leadville was a long awaited result of a project started 13 years ago by Political Science Clinical Associate Professor James Walsh. Intent on finding out more about the history of 19th century...

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Alan Vajda advises you think before you eat fish from the South Platte

June 18, 2019

Integrative Biology Associate Professor Alan Vajda is one researcher who said there’s more to consider before eating fish from the South Platte. “Mercury is far from being the only concern to fish health,” he said. “Even if wastewater treatment plants were doing everything they could do to remove 100 percent...

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