Approved Course List

 

CU Succeed Approved Course Offerings
 


BIOL 1136: Human Biology – Topics include: basic human body chemistry, healthy internal body balance, new disease treatments, human inheritance and human beings as part of Earth's living systems; 3 credits

BIOL 1550: Basic Biology I: Ecology and the Diversity of Life – Introduces important biological concepts, including: the process of science, biological diversity, evolution, basic ecological principles and environmental issues. Lectures emphasize current issues. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

BIOL 1560: Basic Biology II: From Cells to Organisms – Introduces students to cell structure and function, survey of representative human systems, genetics and applications of biotechnology. Immune systems featured with an emphasis on Aids, cancer and other human diseases prevalent in today's world. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

BIOL 2010: Organisms to Ecosystems –  Introduces four major areas of study: (1) evolution,(2) animal structure and function, (3) plant structure and function and (4) ecology.   This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

BIOL 2011: Organisms to Ecosystems Lab –  Study of evolution, plant and animal anatomy, developmental biology; includes two off- campus ecology field trips.  This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 1 credit

BIOL 2020: Molecules to Cells – Introduces four major areas of study: (1) the chemistry of biological systems; (2) the structure and function of the cell; (3) cellular energy transformations (photosynthesis and respiration); and (4) genetics (mitosis, meiosis, patterns of inheritance, molecular genetics). This class is intended for students planning to take upper division biology courses and for biology majors.  It is recommended that students have completed CHEM 1000 or high school chemistry prior to taking this course. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

BIOL 2021: Molecules to Cells Lab – Introduces the basic scientific approach and report preparation through exercises and experiments in cell biology, basic biochemical techniques, genetics, molecular genetics and applications of biotechnology. This class is intended for students planning to take upper division biology courses and for biology majors. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 1 credit


BUSI 1200: Career and Professional Development – This first year course develops a student’s professional skills, providing knowledge on key factors for early and long-term career success. Through applied learning and career-oriented experiences, the course covers: career and major exploration, student resources, resume writing, interview skills, business communications, professional etiquette, emotional intelligence, time management, ethical behavior, and workplace expectations. Students will have opportunities to develop their own professional network with business leaders as new members of the Business School. 3 credits

FNCE 1100: Introduction to Financial Management – Fundamental tools and techniques applicable to financial planning of businesses. Covers valuation of securities, risk-return relationship, capital budgeting, management of current assets and liabilities with extension to international areas; 3 credits

FNCE 1200: Introduction to Investing – Fundamental tools and techniques applicable to financial planning of businesses. Covers valuation of securities, risk-return relationship, capital budgeting, management of current assets and liabilities with extension to international areas; 3 credits

MGMT 1000: Introduction to Business – This course will introduce students to the nature and role of business in our society. Problems confronting business are surveyed from a management, financial, economic and marketing viewpoint. Career opportunities in business are also considered. Students are advised to take this course during their freshman year and may not take it in the junior or senior years. Prereq: Open to freshman and sophomores, non-degree students and music majors at all levels. 3 credits

MKTG 1000: Introduction to Marketing – Provides an introduction and overview of marketing. Discusses market and buyer analysis. Includes product planning, pricing, promotion and distribution of goods and services; 3 credits



CHEM 1000: Foundations for General Chemistry – This course prepares for CHEM 2031 or 1130. Prereq: MATH 1110 or high school equivalent; Enrollment in this course is strongly encouraged prior to enrollment in Chem 2031 if the student does not have a strong and recent background in general chemistry; 3 credits

CHEM 1474: Core Chemistry: Chemistry for Everyday – Focuses on the common household chemicals that affect us on a daily basis. Students explore current topics in chemistry and the underlying chemistry of nuclear power, plastics, sunscreens, food, acid rain, etc. Home-based laboratory experiments with safe, common substances. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

CHEM 2031: General Chemistry I – Topics include chemical structure, atomic and molecular properties, molecular geometry and bonding, and gas laws. Prepares students to take upper division chemistry courses. It is strongly recommended that students have taken CHEM 1000 and MATH 1110 or their high school equivalents to be adequately prepared to succeed in this course; This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

CHEM 2038: General Chemistry Laboratory I – Students perform laboratory experiments on topics covered in CHEM 2031 and gain experience in observing, recording, and interpreting physical and chemical phenomena. Coreq: CHEM 2031 or CHEM 2081. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 1 credit

CHEM 2061: General Chemistry II – Topics include kinetics, equilibria and thermodynamics. Prereq: CHEM 2031 or 2081 with a C- or higher. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

CHEM 2068: General Chemistry Laboratory II – Students gain experience with laboratory technique and elementary chemical instrumentation. Prereq: CHEM 2038 or 2088 with a C- or higher. Coreq: CHEM 2061 or 2091. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 2 credits



COMM 1001: Presentations and Civic Life – Democratic life is all about sharing ideas, debating key issues, and creating a sense of community—democracy is communication. This class teaches students how to deliver successful presentations in civic venues; 3 credits

COMM 1011: Communication and Communities – All day, every day, we communicate with others. This survey class teaches students the fundamental roles communication plays in our everyday lives, work places, communities, and interpersonal relationships. The course foregrounds the ways different communities practice different methods of communication. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

COMM 1021: Introduction to Media Studies – This class introduces students to the economy of the media, the analysis of media messages and new media technologies, and the ways popular culture influences our daily behavior. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

COMM 1041: Interpersonal Communication—This class merges communication theory and practice to help students become better practitioners of communication within their personal, work, family, and other relationships; 3 credits

COMM 1071: Introduction to Journalism – This class gives a broad overview of the histories of, debates within, and best practices for journalism in print, digital, and other media, in a writing intensive course; 3 credits

COMM 2020: Communication, Citizenship and Social Justice – This discussion-based class focuses on the early American foundations of citizenship in our country and how we can effectively communicate about 21st century citizenship issues to create knowledgeable, community-oriented citizens; 3 credits

COMM 2050: Professional Presentations – This skills-based class focuses on preparing students to become effective communicators in any business or professional environment, and addresses questions of new media technology, professional etiquette, and how to perform well in small-group settings; 3 credits



CRJU 1000: Criminology and Criminal Justice: An Overview – This course is designed to provide an overview of the criminal justice process and the criminal justice system in general. Concepts of crime, deviance and justice are discussed and general theories of crime causality are examined. Special emphasis is placed on the components of the criminal justice system: the police, the prosecutorial and defense functions, the judiciary and the field of corrections. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

CRJU 2041: Criminological Theory – This course provides a general survey of the nature and causes of crime and efforts of the criminal justice system to predict, prevent, modify and correct this behavior. This course involves a critical appraisal of various theories of crime causation, including an examination of biological, psychological, economic and sociological perspectives that explain crime and deviance; 3 credits



ENGL 1020: Core Composition I –  Provides opportunities to write for different purposes and audiences, with an emphasis on learning how to respond to various rhetorical situations; improving critical thinking, reading, and writing abilities; understanding various writing processes; and gaining a deeper knowledge of language conventions. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

ENGL 1200: Introduction to Fiction – Introduces class members to the works of famous authors as well as to major themes, elements, and techniques of fiction in both short stories and novels; 3 credits

ENGL 1400: Literary Studies – Helps students develop a sense of literary techniques and issues so they can bring an improved critical sensibility to their reading and writing. Note: Designed for students who are seriously interested in literature. This course assumes that students have completed or are currently taking ENGL1020; 3 credits

ENGL 1601: Storytelling: Literature, Film, and Television – Asks students to explore how stories determine who we are. Everything people do fits into a narrative pattern, evident everywhere from TV news to memory to daily schedules. We tell ourselves stories about ourselves and others--how do these stories shape who we are as cultural beings? This course assumes that students have completed or are currently taking ENGL 1020. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

ENGL 2030: Core Composition II – Focuses on academic and other types of research-based writing and builds on the work completed in ENGL 1020. Focuses on critical thinking, reading and writing as well as working with primary and secondary source material to produce a variety of research-based essays. Emphasis on using both print-based and electronic-based information. Prereq: ENGL 1020. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

ENGL 2156: Introduction to Creative Writing – Reading, discussing, writing short fiction and poetry in a workshop setting. This course assumes that students have completed ENGL 1020; 3 credits

ENGL 2600: Greatest Hits – Offers a cultural history of the best-seller over several hundred years, ranging from blockbuster films to popular novels, viral videos, and musical "hits." We will explore popular works in a range of different media, asking how they achieved the status of a best-seller in different cultural settings.  This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

ENGL 2250: Introduction to Film – Introduces students to the critical study of cinema as an art form and a cultural phenomenon. Topics include cinematography, editing, mise-en-scene and sound; the connections between cinema and related art forms; film genres; the social dimensions of film production and reception; and films by such key filmmakers as Alfred Hitchcock, Maya Deren and Spike Lee; 3 credits



ENVS 1044: Introduction to Environmental Sciences – This survey course develops a basic understanding of ecological relationships and environmental systems. Issues such as the effects of human activities on earth’s environment, extinction or diversity, greenhouse effect, hazardous or toxic wastes and human population growth are discussed. Students must also take the accompanying laboratory ENVS 1045. No co-credit with ENVS 1042; 3 credits

ENVS 1045: Introduction to Environmental Sciences Laboratory – Introduces the basic scientific approach through investigations, observations, and experiments in environmental science. Students must also take the accompanying lecture ENVS 1044. No co-credit with ENVS 1042. Prereq or co-req: ENVS 1044; 1 credit



ETST 2000: Introduction to Ethnic Studies – Multi-disciplinary survey of contemporary and historical research analyses of the diverse social, economic, political, and cultural facets of African American, American Indian, Asian American, and Latino communities and cultures. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

ETST 2024: Race and Ethnic Relations – Surveys race and ethnicity, facts and myths about great populations, and the social and cultural sources of bias and discrimination; 3 credits

ETST 2108: Introduction to Chicanx and Latinx Studies –This course introduces students to the broad range of the interdisciplinary fields of Chicanx and Latinx Studies by examining the Chicanx and Latinx experience including history, identity, politics, immigration, labor, literature, and popular culture; 3 credits

ETST 2155: African American History – Surveys the history of African Americans. Study interpretations, and analysis of major problems, issues, and trends affecting the African American population from pre-slavery to the present. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

ETST 2357: Asian American & Pacific Islander Cultures – This is an introductory course that will examine how Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have been represented in American popular culture and how Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have sought to challenge and complicate those dominant cultural images to define themselves and their diverse experiences; 3 Credits

ETST 2400: Issues in Chicano/a Education – Historical overview of segregation, landmark court cases and immigration policy in the education of Chicano/as in Colorado and nationally from 1920 to the present. The intersection of these issues in the education of undocumented students is also examined. 3 credits



FINE 1001: Introduction to Art – The course introduces visual analysis and critical examination of art from prehistory to modern times. Through reading, vocabulary development, group discussions, tests, and research projects, students will learn how to appreciate art and critically evaluate form, content, and context; This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

FINE 1120 - Digital Photography for Non-Majors – Students will learn fundamentals of digital photography through creative assignments that promote a broad understanding of the photographic medium. Topics include digital camera operation, sizing and resolution, principles of design, and interpreting photographic meaning. This course is designed for non-art majors; 3 credits

FINE 1400: Two Dimensional Design – Focuses on the concepts and visual elements of all forms of two-dimensional art. Students gain an understanding of basic design principles as they analyze and visually articulate formal concerns in viewing contemporary and historical artworks as applied to studio problems: 3 credits

FINE 2155 - Introduction to Digital Photography  Students learn digital image manipulation, input and output strategies, and digital camera functions through assignments that emphasize conceptual development. Presentations, readings, projects and class discussions help students gain an understanding of the role of digital imaging in contemporary photography; 3 credits

FINE 2200: Painting I – This course is an introduction to the language of painting. Students will learn to develop composition in layers, working from value to color and from direct observation to abstraction while exploring the range of visual possibilities that painting offers; 3 credits

FINE 2600: Art History Survey I –  A lecture course studying Western and non-Western art from prehistory to medieval times, including major artists and periods. Through visual analysis, vocabulary acquisition, exams, and writing assignments, students demonstrate knowledge of historical developments and an ability to analyze the arts; 3 credits

FINE 2610: Art History Survey II – A lecture course studying Western and non-Western art from the Renaissance to today, including major artists and periods. Through visual analysis, vocabulary acquisition, exams, and writing assignments, students demonstrate knowledge of historical developments and an ability to analyze the arts. Prereq: FINE 2600; 3 credits


INTS 2020 -  Foundations of International Studies – Through a combination of lecture, discussion, and hands-on learning activities, students will develop skills and abilities necessary for academic and professional success in the international studies arena, especially critical thinking, connection building, conceptual understanding, and cultural awareness. The course is structured in three phases: (1) core interdisciplinary concepts; (2) regional foci; and (3) global issues; 3 Credits.

 

ARAB 1000: Introduction to Cultures of the Arabic-Speaking World – Introduces students to the Arabicspeaking cultures of North Africa, some Asian countries, and the Gulf States, with a focus on politics, culture, economics, literature and the arts. Taught in English. 3 credits

ARAB 1010: Beginning Arabic I – Beginning course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) designed for students who have not had any experience with the language. 5 credits

ARAB 1020: Beginning Arabic II – Beginning course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) designed for students who have not had any experience with the language. 5 credits

CHIN 1000: China and the Chinese – A multidisciplinary introduction to Chinese society both past and present. Prehistory, birth of imperial China, literature, philosophy, religion, nationalism, revolution, modernization, contemporary life, social structure, gender, food, family life, population policy, ethnicity, popular culture, economics and politics. 3 credits.

CHIN 1010: Beginning Mandarin Chinese I – Explore the basics of Mandarin Chinese in this introductory course, designed to develop essential communicative skills through a task-based curriculum. Engage in real-world exercises to build proficiency in pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading, and writing, while learning key phrases and over 300 characters. 5 credits. 

CHIN 1020:  Beginning Mandarin Chinese II – Progress in Mandarin Chinese is the focus of this second-semester course, designed to expand upon the essential communicative skills established in CHIN 1010. Students will engage in advanced real-world exercises to further their proficiency in pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course aims to deepen students’ knowledge of Mandarin by increasing their vocabulary, teaching them to create more complex sentences, and introducing an additional 300-400 characters. 5 credits

CHIN 2110: Intermediate Mandarin Chinese I – Continuing development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in practical Chinese, with grammar review and introduction of the Chinese dictionary. In addition to contemporary Chinese, there is some emphasis on Chinese classical materials, such as proverbs. This course assumes that students have passed CHIN 1020 or equivalent, or have taken two years of high school Chinese, or possess equivalent proficiency. A grade of C- or higher in CHIN 1020 is recommended for success in this course. 3 credits

CHIN 2120: Intermediate Mandarin Chinese II – (Continuation of CHIN 2110.) Satisfies the fourth semester language requirement at most graduate schools. This course assumes that students have passed CHIN 2110 or equivalent, or have taken three years of high school Chinese, or possess equivalent proficiency. A grade of C- or higher in CHIN 2110 is recommended for success in this course. 3 credits

FREN 1000:  Introduction to Cultures of the French-Speaking World – Introduces students to the many cultures of the French-speaking world. Taught in English for accessibility to students from different colleges at the University. The countries studied are: France, its overseas departments (Guadeloupe and Martinique) and territories (Tahiti); Quebec; Senegal; and other African countries. 3 credits

FREN 1001:  French Language I – Introductory course in French language skills, in which basic grammatical structures are introduced, together with elementary vocabulary and cultural items that allow the student to carry on simple conversations in French. 4 credits.

FREN 1002 -  French Language II –   Second semester of elementary French language skills continuation of French Language I (FREN 1001). More complex grammatical structures are introduced together with appropriate vocabulary and cultural and literary readings that allow students to carry on more complex conversations. 4 credits. 

FREN 2110: Intermediate French I – Designed to further develop all the language skills, with particular emphasis on reading and writing, and to further continue students' introduction to French culture. Students review grammar and vocabulary, read and discuss Le Petit Prince, and express their reactions to the text both orally and in writing. This course assumes that students have passed FREN 1002 or 1020 or equivalent, or have taken two years of high school French, or possess equivalent proficiency. A grade of C- or higher in the previous French course is recommended for success in this course. 3 credits

FREN 2120: Intermediate French II – Designed to further develop all the language skills, with particular emphasis on speaking, and to continue students' introduction to French culture. Students review grammar and vocabulary, read and discuss short cultural texts and participate in oral activities intended to increase communication skills. This course assumes that students have passed FREN 2003 or 2110 or equivalent, or have taken three years of high school French, or possess equivalent proficiency. A grade of C- or higher in the previous French course is recommended for success in this course. 3 credits

GRMN 1000: Germany and the Germans – Introduces the ways in which the various aspects of German culture help define German life and national identity. By examining art, music and media, primarily of the 20th century, students explore what it means to be German. 3 credits.

GRMN 1010: Beginning German I – Introduces basic grammar, sentence structure and speech patterns. Note: Students may not enroll in any lower division (1000/2000) language skills course in which their level of proficiency exceeds that of the course. 5 credits. 

GRMN 1020:  Beginning German II – (Continuation of GRMN 1010.) 

GRMN 2110: Intermediate German I – (Continuation of German 1020.) This course assumes that students have passed GRMN 1020 or equivalent, or have taken two years of high school German, or possess equivalent proficiency. A grade of C- or higher in GRMN 1020 is recommended for success in this course. 3 credits

GRMN 2130: Intermediate German II – A fourth-semester course designed for those majoring or minoring in International Affairs. Along with grammar review, the course deals with contemporary topics in cultural, political, economic and social affairs. This course assumes that students have passed GRMN 2110 or equivalent, or have taken three years of high school German, or possess equivalent proficiency. A grade of C- or higher in GRMN 2110 is recommended for success in this course. 3 credits

GRMN 2150: Intermediate German II: Grammar Review and Oral Practice –  Prepares students for upper division. German language skills courses. Students practice abilities gained in previous semesters of language instruction, improve conversational abilities, develop skills using reference works, learn tactics for reading and discussing newspaper style German and develop written composition abilities. This course assumes that students have passed GRMN2110 or equivalent, or have taken three years of high school German, or possess equivalent proficiency. A grade of C- or higher in GRMN 2110 is recommended for success in this course. 3 credits

LATN 2010: Intermediate Latin I –  Introduces advanced Latin grammar, vocabulary, syntax, and stylistics of Latin prose via readings in Caesar, Cicero and Livy. Includes review of basic Latin grammar, plus introduction to Latin prose composition and Latin rhetoric. Emphasis on historical, cultural, social context of authors and works. This course assumes that students have passed LATN 1020 or equivalent, or have taken two years of high school Latin, or possess equivalent proficiency. A grade of C- or higher in LATN 1020 is recommended for success in this course. 3 credits

LATN 2020: Intermediate Latin II – Completes the presentation of advanced Latin grammar, vocabulary, syntax, and stylistics of Latin prose. Continues the study of Latin prose composition and Latin rhetoric with emphasis on historical, cultural, and social context of authors and works. Note: This course assumes that students have passed LATN 2010 or equivalent, or have taken three years of high school Latin, or possess equivalent proficiency. 3 credits

SPAN 1000: Introduction to Cultures of the Spanish Speaking World – Introduces students to the Spanish-speaking cultures of Spain, Latin America, and the United States through a historical overview and a focus on contemporary politics and culture. Note: Taught in English. 3 credits

SPAN 2110: Second Year Spanish I – Continues the development of skills acquired in 1010 and 1020. Readings deal with Hispanic culture and current topics from Spain and Latin America. Development of informal oral and written expression. 3 credits

SPAN 2120: Second Year Spanish II – Continues the development of skills acquired in SPAN 1010, 1020 and 2110, together with a review of grammar. Readings deal with Hispanic culture and literature. Development of informal oral and written expression. 3 credits

SPAN 3010: Spanish Composition I – Expansion and reinforcement of oral and written skills in Spanish at an advanced level, in a broad cultural context. Oral activities are individual and in groups. Topics are introduced through oral activities, and are then used for written assignments. 3 credits



GEOG 1302: Introduction to Human Geography – Systematic introduction to basic concepts and approaches in human geographic analysis. 3 credits


HIST 1016: World History to 1500 – Surveys the rise of civilizations and their interactions from prehistoric to modern times. The emphasis is on the understanding of the various styles or characteristics of civilizations within a global context. 3 credits

HIST 1026: World History Since 1500 – Surveys the interactions of the world's civilizations in modern times. The emphasis is on understanding the concept of modernization within a global context. 3 credits

HIST 1211: Western Civilization I – Introduces ancient Mediterranean civilization and the birth of Europe. Covers topics on economics and society, political organization, intellectual history, and art from 3000 B.C. to A.D. 1500; 3 credits

HIST 1212: Western Civilization II – Introduces modern European civilization and its spread over the world. Covers topics on economics and society, political organization, intellectual history, and art from A.D. 1500 to the 20th century; 3 credits

HIST 1361: U.S. History to 1876 – Provides an introduction to the major forces, events and individuals that shaped the historical development of American society, beginning with the European settlement of America and concluding with the Civil War, reconstruction and the early growth of an industrial order. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

HIST 1362: U.S. History Since 1876 – Provides an introduction to the major forces, events, and individuals that shaped the historical development of American society from the Civil War to the present. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

HIST 1381: The History of Now – Examines several topics of profound interest to historians world wide: nature and technology, secular and religious faiths, and concepts of political union. The experience of the U.S. as it relates to the experiences of other periods and cultures. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

HIST 1400: Controversies in History – Examines a variety of cases where historians have significant disagreement or diverse interpretations regarding “what happened” and “why,” to come to an understanding of what historians do and how they do it. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits



HUMN 1012: The Humanistic Tradition: Modes of Expression – Familiarizes students with humanistic modes of expression through the study of history, literature, philosophy, music, and the visual and dramatic arts; 3 credits


MATH 1080: Calculus for Social Sciences and Business – A one-semester course in single-variable calculus. Topics include limits, derivatives, differentiation rules, integration and integration rules. Emphasis is on applications to business and social sciences. Note: No knowledge of trigonometry is required. Those planning to take more than one semester of calculus should take MATH 1401 instead of MATH 1080. MATH 1070 or MATH 1110 with a C- or higher is required for students to register for this course. No co-credit with MATH 1401. Max hours: 3 Credits. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

MATH 1110: College Algebra – Topics in algebra designed for students who intend to take the calculus sequence. Functions, domains, ranges, graphs, data scatter plots and curve fitting, solving equations and systems of equations, polynomial functions, rational functions, and selected other topics. Graphic calculators and/or computer algebra systems are used extensively. 24 on ACT-Math, 560 on SAT-Math or above average performance in intermediate algebra, algebraic literacy or integrated math are strongly recommended as preparation for this course. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

MATH 1120: College Trigonometry – Topics in trigonometry, analytic geometry, and elementary functions designed for students who intend to take the calculus sequence. Angles and trigonometry functions of acute angles, analytic trigonometry, fundamental trigonometric functions and identities including hyperbolic trigonometry, parametric equations, and polar coordinate system. Graphic calculators and/or computer algebra systems are used extensively. This course assumes that students have mathematical knowledge equivalent to MATH 1110 or MATH 1070. Students with a grade of B- or better in MATH 1110 or MATH 1070 pass the course at a much higher rate. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

MATH 1130: Precalculus Mathematics – Condensed treatment of the topics in MATH 1110 and 1120. No co-credit with MATH 1070, 1110 or 1120. This course assumes that students have mathematical knowledge equivalent to a grade of C- or better in College Algebra and Trigonometry. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

MATH 1401: Calculus I – First course of a three-semester sequence (MATH 1401, 2411, 2421) in calculus. Topics covered include limits, derivatives, applications of derivatives, and the definite integral. To be able to register for this course, students must first be entered into the MATH 1401 Student Group. To be eligible, students must demonstrate that they have mathematical knowledge equivalent to MATH 1120 or MATH 1130. Students can demonstrate this proficiency 1) by having an SAT score of 620 or an ACT score of 27, taken within the last three years, or 2) by having completed and transferred in a course that is the exact equivalent of MATH 1401 at a different institution, or 3) by earning a score of 70% or higher on the prerequisite exam administered through the MERC lab. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

MATH 2411: Calculus II – The second of a three-semester sequence (MATH 1401, 2411, 2421) in calculus. Topics covered include exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals and infinite series. Pre-req: C- or better in MATH 1401. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

MATH 2421: Calculus III – The third of a three-semester sequence in Calculus (MATH 1401, 2411 and 2421). Topics include vectors, vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, differentiation, multiple integration, and vector calculus. Prereq: C- or better in MATH 2411. Note: Students with a grade of B- or better in MATH 2411 pass this course at a much higher rate. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

MATH 2830: Introductory Statistics – Basic statistical concepts, summarizing data, probability concepts, distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course. Prereq: intermediate algebra. This course assumes that students have knowledge equivalent to three years of high school mathematics (two years of algebra), intermediate algebra, or Algebraic Literacy at a Colorado Community College at the start of class. Students who have a grade of B- or better in one of these courses pass at a much higher rate. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

MATH 3200: Elementary Differential Equations – First and second order differential equations, Laplace transforms, systems of equations, with an emphasis on modeling and applications. Note: No co-credit with MATH 3195. The course is designed for students in the sciences and engineering. Note: No co-credit with MATH 3200 and MATH 3191. Note: This course assumes that students have taken MATH 2411 or equivalent. Students who have a grade of B- or better in MATH 2411 pass this course at a much higher rate; 3 credits



PMUS 1001: Music Appreciation –  Explores the style of music in the major compositional periods, including contemporary pop styles. This course will not satisfy any degree requirements for music majors. For non-music majors who want to learn how to listen to music with greater understanding and pleasure. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

PMUS 1023: Piano Class – This course focuses on beginning note reading in both treble and bass clefs, learning one octave major key scales, basic harmonization, and beginning improvisation. Students perform in both individual and group settings; 3 credits

PMUS 1100: Music Theory I – Study of the evolution of harmonic and melodic procedures, as derived from the common practice period of classical music, and their relationship to contemporary music concepts. 3 credits

PMUS 1110: Ear Training and Sight Singing I – An aural skills laboratory course that reinforces the concepts taught in Music Theory I through interval, melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation as well as the preparation and sight singing of music; 1 credit



PHIL 1012: Truth, Reality, and the Good Life: Introduction to Philosophy – We’re commonly told to “do the right thing,” and everybody seems to agree that we should. But what is right? What is wrong? How can we see and know the difference? This course helps students examine and analyze the ethical concepts, situations, and problems raised by these fundamental questions. Specific problems will vary with contemporary concerns, e.g., poverty, war, injustice, famine, abortion, punishment, and environmental sustainability. The course goal is to help students sharpen their ethical reasoning skills so they can better navigate and contribute to the ethical, social, and political arenas in which they will live their lives. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

PHIL 1020: Right, Wrong, and Seeing the Difference: Introduction to Ethics – We’re commonly told to “do the right thing,” and everybody seems to agree that we should. But what is right? What is wrong? How can we see and know the difference? This course helps students examine and analyze the ethical concepts, situations, and problems raised by these fundamental questions. Specific problems will vary with contemporary concerns, e.g., poverty, war, injustice, famine, abortion, punishment, and environmental sustainability. The course goal is to help students sharpen their ethical reasoning skills so they can better navigate and contribute to the ethical, social, and political arenas in which they will live their lives. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

PHIL 2441 - Logic, Language and Scientific Reasoning – Intro course in argumentation, critical thinking and scientific reasoning. Covers rules of logical inference, informal fallacies, problem solving, and probabilistic reasoning. Enhances analytical and critical thinking skills tested on LSAT and MCAT, central to advancement in sciences, and broadly desired by employers. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits



PHYS 1100: Foundations of Physics – One-semester non-lab survey course especially designed for non-science majors. Acquaints students with some of the major principles and methods of physics. Includes applications of physics to everyday life and some discussion of the historical development of physics. Prereq: A good working knowledge of elementary algebra. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

PHYS 1052: General Astronomy I – The history of astronomy is studied from early civilizations to the present. The basic motions of the earth, moon, sun, and planets are discussed both qualitatively and quantitatively, using elementary principles of physics. Properties of our solar system are discussed in detail, including results from unmanned space probes. This course assumes that students have completed high school algebra or equivalent. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

PHYS 2010: College Physics I – This is an algebra based physics course covering mechanics, heat and sound. Prereq: College algebra and trigonometry. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

PHYS 2020: College Physics II – This is an algebra based physics course covering electricity, magnetism, light and modern physics. Prereq: PHYS 2010. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 4 credits

PHYS 2311: General Physics I: Calculus-Based – This is a calculus based physics course covering vector displacement, uniform and accelerated motion, force, momentum, energy, rotating systems, oscillations, and an introduction to thermodynamics. 

PHYS 2321:Intro Experimental Physics Lab – This introductory experimental physics laboratory introduces students to the methods of science through a series of experiments and exercises focused on how objects move. Students working in teams use mathematical and computational approaches to acquire data, examine data, and make conclusions about how well these data support hypotheses and models. Students will use different types of scientific communication, including graphs and other forms of data visualization and cogent written and oral evaluation of experimental findings; 1 credit

PHYS 2331: General Physics II: Calculus-Based – This is a calculus based physics course covering electrostatics, magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves (including light), and optics; 4 credits

PHYS 2341: Intro Experimental Physics Lab II – This introductory experimental physics laboratory introduces students to the methods of science through a series of experiments and exercises focused on electricity and magnetism. Students working in teams use mathematical and computational approaches to acquire data, examine data, and make conclusions about how well these data support hypotheses and models. Students will use different types of scientific communication, including graphs and other forms of data visualization and cogent written and oral evaluation of experimental findings; 1 credit

PHYS 2711: Vibrations and Waves – Introduces vibrations and waves associated with physical phenomena. Analytic and numerical methods in physical contexts. Topics include harmonic oscillators, resonance, coupled oscillators, nonlinear oscillators, waves in elastic media, sound waves, pulses and dispersion; 3 credits

PHYS 2811: Modern Physics I – Presents a study of the events and discoveries that occurred during the latter part of the 19th and the first part of the 20th centuries which led to the discovery of quantum mechanics; namely, special relativity, particle nature of radiation, wave properties of particles, models of the atom, and the introduction of quantum mechanics; 3 credits



PSCI 1001: Introduction to Political Science: The Quest for Freedom and Justice – Introduces the study of politics, its human importance, and its relationship to social institutions. Analysis of the relationship between individual political behavior and characteristics of the political system. Development of key concepts such as power, legitimacy, authority, political socialization, and revolution. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

PSCI 1101: American Political System – General introduction to the American political system with emphasis upon citizen involvement, the relationships among the various levels and branches of government, formal and informal institutions, processes, and behavior. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

PSCI 2006: Global Political Issues – Studies global political issues, exploring the broad forces at play in the world: international economics, national interests, military power, nationalism, ethnicity, the environment and human rights. Discussion of world events and underlying global issues, incorporating analytical tools used by political scientists; 3 credits



PSYC 1000: Introduction to Psychology I – Introduces the scientific study of behavior, including an overview of the biological basis of behavior, sensation or perception, states of consciousness, learning and memory, thinking and language, intelligence, motivation and emotion. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

PSYC 1005: Introduction to Psychology II – Introduces the scientific study of behavior, including an overview of the history of psychology, development, personality, psychological disorders, therapy, health psychology and social behavior. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits


PBHL 1001: Race, Gender, Class, & Health – Course focuses on the principles, tools, and population approach of social epidemiology as it relates health to race, gender, and class. Contemporary topics in public health will be used as case studies to illuminate principles and tools both in lecture and in recitation sections; 3 credits


SOCY 1001: Understanding the Social World –This survey course provides an introduction to the sociological study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture. Typical course topics include socialization, the family, criminology, deviance, inequalities, sex and gender, race and ethnicity, health and medicine, self and identities, and globalization. Students gain an understanding of how organizations, institutions, and structures of society shape individual and group experiences. This is Guarenteed Transfer List course; 3 credits

SOCY 2001: Inequalities in the Social World – Introduces students to critical sociological perspectives on social inequality. Major sociological factors contributing to the production and reproduction of inequality in various social organizations and institutions are analyzed; 3 credits

SOCY 2440: Deviance and Social Control – This course examines different forms of deviance and how deviant categories are created. Emphasis is on how groups gain control over social definitions and the consequences these definitions have in the form of norms, laws, and informal social sanctions; 3 credits

SOCY 2462: Introduction to Social Psychology – Studies the development and functioning of persons, especially within a group context, and the dynamics of small groups. Emphasis is on import of symbols for human behavior, development of self-concepts, and the processes of competition and cooperation in group dynamics. This is a Guaranteed Transfer List course; 3 credits