Published: July 27, 2022

Believe it or not, the Fall 2022 semester is just around the corner, and we have a few courses that still have room left in them. 

Jump to Graduate Courses

A professor leans over the shoulder of students in his class to demonstrate something on a laptop. Four other students are in the background

Undergraduate Courses – Course Descriptions

 

PSCI 1001: Introduction to Political Science: The Quest for Freedom and Justice (Campus, MW 11:00-12:15pm)

Introduces the study of politics, its human importance, and its relationship to social institutions. Analysis of the relationship between individual political behavior and characteristics of the political system. Development of key concepts such as power, legitimacy, authority, political socialization, and revolution.

 

PSCI 3002: Topics Course: Politics in the Black Community (Campus, TR 12:30-1:45pm)


This course examines the experience of Black Americans within the American political landscape. Race identity politics in the United States shaped the social conditions and cultural capital of Black America. Therefore, the course critically analyzes how social movements including Civil Rights, Black Power, #BlackLivesMatter, and others addressed the political and economic status of the Black Community. The overall goal of this course is to give students a pragmatic understanding of how politics in the Black Community both initiated and resisted political trends in the United States.

 

PSCI 3022: Political Systems of the World (Online, section E02)

The class focuses on the analyses of various political systems around the world. Students will look at democracies and dictatorships, industrialized countries and developing countries. Though a structured comparison, students will assess and test key theories in Political Science. Note: This course may count for the International Studies major or minor. See your INTS advisor for more information. Term offered: fall, spring, summer.

 

PSCI 4126: Introduction to International Political Economy (Online, section E01)


A short introduction to international economy, including classic readings of international political economy (such as Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Lenin), and more recent work on globalization, applying related theories to the current world economy. Note: This course may count for the International Studies major or minor. See your INTS advisor for more information. Repeatable. Max Hours: 6 Credits.

 

PSCI 4150: Gender Politics in the Middle East (Campus, T 2:00 - 4:50pm)

This course is about Middle Eastern women’s subjectivity and various forms of agency. It explores the nexus of domestic, regional, and international forces that shapes the lives of Middle Eastern women, in the Algerian, Egyptian, Iranian, Israeli, and Palestinian contexts. Far from being silent observers of the contests among these forces, as is often assumed, Middle Eastern women have been active actors in the public arena since the 19th century colonial encounter and the importation of the modern state to the region using an array of means to make their voices heard. Theirs were often more militant than those of their countrymen. The course is divided into two parts: the first part provides an overview of the theoretical notions discussed such as Orientalism, agency, colonialism, and post-colonialism. Related to this theoretical section is a historical overview that is necessary to the understanding of the contemporary conditions of Middle Eastern women and the continuities and changes between past and present. The second part covers pressing topics in the lives of Middle Eastern women in the post-independence era such as the rise of Political Islam, the global trend of democratization, war, and occupation. The emphasis in this section is on women as active participants in the debates surrounding these issues, rather than as objects of them. The readings assigned include both texts written by scholars from the region and by others from without. They provide analyses of the contexts within which Middle Eastern women’s struggles take place. In addition, students will be exposed to materials produced by Middle Eastern women activists that express their own opinions and views to avoid misrepresentation and to reflect the diversity among them. Cross-listed with WGST 4150. Max hours: 3 Credits.
 

PSCI 4535: Labor and Working-Class Politics (Campus, T 12:00-3:20pm)

Explores the status of the labor movement both in the U.S. and internationally, as well as the political, philosophical, and social implications of socioeconomic class status and identity. Cross-listed with PSCI 5535

 

PSCI 4074: Urban Politics (Campus, R 5:00-7:20pm)

The crisis and the promise of U.S. cities. Nature and roots of critical urban problems. Citizen involvement in urban decision making. Government as problem and as solution.

 

PSCI 4807: Political Violence (Campus, W 5:00-7:50pm)

Investigates different types of political violence including genocide, ethnic and religious conflict, revolution, terrorism, war, state repression and others. Introduces theories of individual, collective and institutional violence, applies them to a range of case studies and explores possible solutions. Max hours: 3 Credits.
 


Graduate Courses – Course Descriptions
 

PSCI 5216: Seminar International Relations (Campus, M 5:00-7:50pm)

Introduces contending theories, empirical studies, and research methods in the field. Writing and discussion of comprehensive research papers in the field of international power politics and alternative attempts at controlling conflicts among nations. Restriction: Restricted to Graduate and Graduate Non-Degree Majors or undergraduate majors in the Bachelor's to Master's program (PSCI-BA-BMA or INTS-BA-BMA). Max Hours: 3 Credits.

 

PSCI 5217: Human Rights in Theory and Practice (Online)

Explores the ideas of human rights and the practical efforts to actualize rights in society. Students study the theories of rights and the evolution of rights in history, as well as work with a service organization. Cross-listed with PSCI 4217. Restriction: Restricted to Graduate and Graduate Non-Degree Majors or undergraduate majors in the Bachelor's to Master's program (PSCI-BA-BMA or INTS-BA-BMA). Max Hours: 3 Credits.

 

PSCI 5610: Middle East Politics (Campus, T 5:00-7:50pm)

Examines the Middle East regional system and the region's role in world politics. Investigates questions regarding politics in Iran, Iraq, Palestinian-Israeli relations, political Islam, and relations with the United States. Restriction: Restricted to Graduate and Graduate Non-Degree Majors or undergraduate majors in the Bachelor's to Master's program (PSCI-BA-BMA or INTS-BA-BMA). Max Hours: 3 Credits.
 

PSCI 5807: Political Violence (Campus, W 5:00-7:50pm)

Theoretical and empirical analysis of conflict behavior, with special emphasis on the explanation of political violence. Revolution, international warfare, and urban unrest are studied as forms of political violence, and the role of systematic empirical research is emphasized in the development of general theories of intergroup conflict. Restriction: Restricted to Graduate and Graduate Non-Degree Majors or undergraduate majors in the Bachelor's to Master's program (PSCI-BA-BMA or INTS-BA-BMA). Max Hours: 3 Credits.