Leo Bruederle photo
Ph.D. • Professor • Emeritus
Department of Integrative Biology

Mailing Address:
Department of Integrative Biology
Campus Box 171
P.O. Box 173364
Denver, CO 80217-3364

Physical Location:
1151 Arapahoe
SI 4101/2071
Denver, CO 80204

Office Hours:
By appointment only

Expertise Areas:
Dr. Bruederle's research interests include the evolution of species rich genera such as Carex (Cyperaceae), which comprises approximately 2000 species worldwide. He is interested specifically in the evolutionary mechanisms that facilitate speciation in this large genus. Additional interests include: plant systematics at and below the level of genus, population genetics and endemism, conservation genetics, and biogeography. He is also interested in the implementation, institutionalization, and assessment of undergraduate research.

Ph.D., Biological Sciences (Botany), Rutgers, 1986
M.S., Biological Sciences (Botany), University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, 1978
B.S., Biology, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, 1973

Dr. Bruederle's research interests include the evolution of species rich genera such as Carex (Cyperaceae), which comprises approximately 2000 species worldwide. He is interested specifically in the evolutionary mechanisms that facilitate speciation in this large genus. Additional interests include: plant systematics at and below the level of genus, population genetics and endemism, conservation genetics, and biogeography. He is also interested in the implementation, institutionalization, and assessment of undergraduate research.

Dr. Bruederle is currently collaborating with colleagues at the Canadian Museum of Nature and Universidad Pablo de Olavide on research addressing the bipolar distribution of certain Carex species. In addition, he is undertaking research funded by the US Fish & Wildlife addressing the systematics and conservation genetics of Penland's alpine fen mustard, a Colorado endemic that is federally listed as threatened. Recently completed research on the pollination biology of Degener's beardtongue, another Colorado endemic, is currently being summarized for publication.

Westergaard, KB, S Fior, LP Bruederle, HK Stenøien, N Zemp, and A Widmer. 2019.  Population genomic evidence for plant glacial survival in Scandinavia. Molecular Ecology. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.14994

Global Carex Group.  2015.  Making Carex monophyletic (Cyperaceae, tribe Cariceae): a new broader circumscription.  Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 179: 1-42.

Villaverde, T, M Escudero, S Martín-Bravo, LP Bruederle, M Luceño, and JR Starr. In press. Direct long-distance dispersal best explains the bipolar distribution of Carex arctogena (Carex sect. Capituligereae, Cyperaceae).  Journal of Biogeography 42: 1514-1525.

Smolinski, SL, PJ Anthamatten, LP Bruederle, JM Barbour, and FB Chambers. 2014. Mountain pine beetle infestation of lodgepole pine in areas of water diversion: implications for forest and water management. Journal of Environmental Management 139: 32-37.

Derieg, NJ, SJ Weil, AA Reznicek, and LP Bruederle. 2013. Carex viridistellata (Cyperaceae), a rare new species of the prairie peninsula. Systematic Botany 38: 82-91.

Smith, P.F., A.A. Reznicek, L. Yeatts, S.J. Popovich, and L.P. Bruederle. 2009. Noteworthy Collections Colorado: Carex conoidea (Cyperaceae). Madroño 56: 68.

Bruederle, L.P., S.L. Yarbrough, and S.D. Fehlberg. 2008. Allozyme variation in the genus Carex… 15 years later. Pages 187-196 in: R. F. C. Naczi and B. A. Ford [eds.], Sedges: Uses, Diversity, and Systematics of the Cyperaceae. Monographs in Systematic Botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden. Missouri Botanical Garden Press, St. Louis.

Derieg, N.J., A. Sanguamphai, and L.P. Bruederle. 2008. Genetic diversity and endemism in North American Carex section ceratocystis (Cyperaceae). American Journal of Botany 95 (10): 1287-1296.

BIOL 3445: Introduction to Evolution, Fall Semester
BIOL 4345/5345: Flora of Colorado, Fall Semester