HUMN 5025 - Foundations and Theories in Interdisciplinary Humanities

Introduces student to interdisciplinary scholarship and practice in the disciplines that comprise the humanities and beyond.  The focus of the course is introducing students to critical theory and the scholarly conversations pertaining the social, political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions of modernity.  This course must be taken in the first fall semester as an MH student in the program. 
Offered every Fall semester.

HUMN/SSCI 5013 - Interdisciplinary Methods and Practice

Introduces students to a wide array of scholarly methodologies in the humanities and social sciences.  Students will learn the key practices and processes for developing themselves into young scholars conversant in a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary methods and practices. This course must be taken in the first spring semester and an MSS or MH student in the program.
Offered every Spring semester.

HUMN 5660 - Visual Arts: Interpretations and Contexts

While we live in a highly image-oriented culture that requires us to constantly negotiate the finer meanings of visual discourse, most of us aren’t aware just how literate we can be about art. Works of art form a critical part of our material culture and often reflect not just aesthetic sensibilities, but political, economic, and cultural dimensions of society. Working from the premise that a work of art or architecture itself is a text to be read and in some way a product of a particular moment in time, we will consider various scholarly approaches towards the interpretation of visual art forms, such as social history, aesthetic theory, and formalism. Although we will consider works that span broad historical eras, from classical antiquity to postmodern America, this course is not a traditional, chronologically exhaustive introductory survey. Rather, its focus is thematic, taking into account historical and cultural contexts and a variety of methodological perspectives on the making, consuming, and meaning of art.

HUMN 5720 - Sexuality, Gender, and Visual Representation

Study of sexuality, gender, and identity representation from classical antiquity through the present in the visual arts. Using literature of visuality, feminism, race, and queer theory, we explore visual representations of femininity, masculinity, and androgyny and their reinforcement and challenge to gender-identity norms. The course endeavors to introduce students to complex theoretical concepts framing their interaction with the visual world and the construction of gender. Students must display a clear familiarity with the theoretical concepts and visual languages discussed in class and must exhibit an ability to interpret data meaningfully and analytically in all assignments.

HUMN 5924 - Directed Research and Readings in Interdisciplinary Humanities

Provides background reading, theory and research approaches for students to develop a thesis, project, or an individualized theme for the oral exam based on their interdisciplinary focus. Max hours: 3 Credits.
Offered every Spring semester.

SSCI 5020 - Foundations and Theories in Interdisciplinary Social Science

Introduces student to interdisciplinary scholarship and practice in the disciplines that comprise the social sciences and beyond.The focus of the course is introducing students to critical theory and the scholarly conversations pertaining the social, political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions of modernity. This course must be taken in the first fall semester as an MSS student in the program.
Offered every Fall semester.

SSCI 5251 - Introduction to Legal Studies

A survey of the United States legal system, including lawmaking powers, jurisdiction, court procedures, professional ethics and major principles of business law, contracts, estates and probate, family law, property and torts. Restriction: Restricted to Graduate Level students. Cross-listed with HUMN 4251/HUMN 5251/SSCI 4241. Max hours: 3 Credits.
Offered every Fall semester.

SSCI 5023 - Research Perspectives in Social Science

Introduces interdisciplinary social research through a critical examination of various methodological approaches. Each student formulates a research proposal which includes a research question, a review of the literature, and methods of study. Restriction: Restricted to Graduate Level students. Max hours: 3 Credits.
Offered every Spring semester.

HUMN/SSCI 5540 - Law, Diversity, and Community in US History

Engaging extensive primary and secondary source material, course applies an interdisciplinary approach to diversity and conflict that often surrounds the quest for economic, moral and social inclusion in the United States.  Restricted to Graduate level students.  Cross-listed with HUMN 5540.
Offered every Fall semester.

HUMN 5770 - Imperialism, Postcolonialism, and Visual Discourse

Empires are complex and difficult entities. From ancient Greece and Rome to modern colonial Europe and America, imperial nations have disseminated their political, social, economic and cultural practices. These strategies typically included visual discourse that reinforced a dominant hegemony, while attempting to mask contentious opposition. The goal of this class is to introduce students to some of these ways visual discourses operated. Together we will explore imperialistic and colonial themes through classic theoretical texts and case studies of colonial imagery and post-colonial analyses of it. We will consider the visual record associated with several prominent historic empires of the west, namely France, Britain, and America as it was deployed through art, visual objects, and their staging or presentation. In doing so we’ll consider phenomena as diverse as mapping, world’s fairs and expositions, museum practices, landscape painting, and exoticism in art as indices of imaging an empire and nationhood.